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Archive for May 11th, 2012

Over the last 4-5 months, there was a lot of media teeth gnashing over the Republican Primaries. A lot of talk about “divisive” social issues, can Romney “seal the deal”, etc. Of course, there is a general media avoidance of those same issues that are actually playing larger on the Democratic side.

One can simply ask, when was the last time that a currently incarcerated felon got more than 40% in a Republican Presidential primary? Of course, Democrats have a long history of voting for and even electing inmates — Boston’s 1904 election for Alderman Curley comes to mind. But a Boston Alderman is a far cry from President of the United States.

Federal Prisoner Fares Well in West Virginia’s Democratic Primary

By JESS BIDGOOD

This year, West Virginia’s Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin and its Senator Joe Manchin, both Democrats, would not say whether they would vote for President Obama, laying bare the fact that the president faces an uphill climb even among members of his own party.

But the president’s campaign took a more bizarre blow during Tuesday night’s primaries in West Virginia, when a prisoner in Texas won more than 40 percent of vote in the Democratic race.

Keith Judd is serving a sentence of more than 17 years at Beaumont Federal Correctional Institution in Texas for extortion charges related to threats he made at the University of New Mexico in 1999.

According to unofficial primary results on the state’s election Web site, Mr. Judd earned 42.73 percent of the vote – 57,081 votes. Mr. Obama won 57.27 percent of the vote, with a final tally of 76,510 votes.

West Virginia has more registered Democrats than Republicans – 52.25 percent to 28.72 percent, at last count – but this state voted for Senator John McCain of Arizona in 2008 and has never warmed to Mr. Obama.

via Federal Prisoner Fares Well in West Virginia’s Democratic Primary – NYTimes.com.

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